Ask a team of international food, wine and travel writers to name their favorite tipple and you’ll find 9 world-best wines from France, the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Italy and Spain make the list.

1. Château Angélus, France

My favorite wine discovery of 2017 is France’s Château Angélus. This wine exemplifies the outstanding Grand Cru Classé that comes from Saint-Émilion. The wine also tells Boüard de Laforest Family’s story, which began in the 1500s. As I savored this Bordeaux, I could only imagine the bells that symbolize this winery, tolling from ancient times to now in the vineyard.

Cori Solomon, freelance writer | www.writtenpalette.com

Château Angélus Winery Saint-Émilion

Château Angélus Winery, Saint-Émilion. Photo courtesy of Château Angélus. FWT Magazine.

2. Black Chicken Zinfandel, United States

I fell in love with The Black Chicken Zinfandel from Robert Biale in California’s Napa Valley. It’s bright, juicy and great to enjoy any season. It was also fascinating to hear the words “black chicken” were code words for their private Zin collection sold during the depression, so nosy neighbors wouldn’t catch on when they overheard phone conversations!

Lorena Lopez, writer | www.travelingsoulo.com

3. Poppie’s Rosé, New Zealand

Poppie’s rosé gets my vote. One sip of this wine takes me to a patio overlooking the vineyards and hills of the Wairarapa in New Zealand’s North Island. Crisp, fragrant, with just a hint of strawberry insures the bottle will not survive for long once opened.

Kurt Jacobson, food and travel blogger | www.tasteoftravel2.com 

Rural views of the Wairarapa, New Zealand (c) Jacqui Gibson. FWT Magazine.

Photo: Rural views of the Wairarapa, New Zealand (c) Jacqui Gibson. FWT Magazine.

4. Karlo Estate’s vegan wine, Canada

My vote goes to Karlo Estate in Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada. They’re the first winery in the world to be officially vegan-certified! They have unique processes to ensure the wine is vegan. First, if Karlo Wines does need to add protein, they use pumpkin or potato. To clarify the wine, they use bentonite clay. Also, their wine is absolutely delicious and has won many awards!

Lauren Yakiwchuk, travel blogger | www.justinpluslauren.com

5. Sweet Leaf Riesling – Burning Kiln Winery, Canada

My favorite wine? I have to say Burning Kiln Winery in Norfolk County Ontario, Canada, two hours west of Toronto. They have a great back story in that the entire area was once known for tobacco farming. Now they utilise the tobacco kilns in the winemaking process and have maintained the tobacco history in all the names of their wines. I’m partial to their Sweet Leaf Riesling, but they also have fabulous food and an incredible eco-glamping facility as part of their offerings.

Mary Chong, travel blogger | www.calculatedtraveller.com

Burning Kiln Winery Norfolk County Ontario Canada © Mary Chong. FWT Magazine.

Photo: Burning Kiln Winery in Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada © Mary Chong. FWT Magazine.

6. Cat Cat The Party Crasher, United States

Cat Cat The Party Crasher from Savannah Oaks Winery in Delano, Tennessee is a great wine. The Blackberry wine is fantastic too, but this one grabbed me because of the story behind the name (you’ll have to read my online story to find out exactly what I mean).

Kathleen Walls, travel writer | www.americanroads.net

7. Pinot Noir, United States

I love the pinot noir from California’s Santa Barbara wine region (Santa Rita Hills). Jalama wines, Brian Loring wines, Cargassachi wines and Foxen Canyon to name a few.

Robin Dohrn-Simpson, writer | www.robindohrnsimpson.com

8. Moscato Bricco Quaglia, Italy

The best dessert wine I’ve ever tasted is the fruity and refreshing Moscato Bricco Quaglia from La Spinetta in the Piedmont region of Italy. I sampled it on a wine-tasting tour in Rome and have been hooked ever since.

Melanie Votaw, travel and entertainment writer | www.tripoutontravel.com

9. Campo Viejo, Spain

I love everything about Spain – the cities, the meats, the cheeses and the wine! I especially enjoy the wines of the Rioja region, and I fell in love with Campo Viejo wines after I learned that all three winemakers there are women. The wines are rich and full of passion.

Beth Helms Graham, travel blogger |  www.momuncorked.com 

Winemaker Clara Canals Sotillo of Campo Vieja; (c) Campo Vieja. FWT Magazine.

Winemaker Clara Canals Sotillo of Campo Vieja; (c) Campo Vieja. FWT Magazine. 

Photo credit for the blog cover image of rosé: Mirabeau en Provence.